Nurse Praxeda Kahwa helps Jumanne Kessy hoist his daughter Esther onto a scale in the Nyamagana District Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. The child and others were weighed as part of a nutrition screening program at the hospital. (Photo by Paul Jeffrey)
Nurse Praxeda Kahwa helps Jumanne Kessy hoist his daughter Esther onto a scale in the Nyamagana District Hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania. The child and others were weighed as part of a nutrition screening program at the hospital. (Photo by Paul Jeffrey)
$31.5 million | DFID | 2015–2020

IMA World Health is leading the new DFID-funded Addressing Stunting in Tanzania Early, or ASTUTE, program. Our consortium, which includes the Partnership for Nutrition in Tanzania, Cornell University’s Division of Nutritional Sciences, and Development Media International, builds the capacity of local government authorities to address child stunting and contribute to the evidence base for what works best and most cost-effectively in Tanzania.

ASTUTE activities will ultimately be implemented in all districts of five regions of the Lake Zone—Kagera, Kigoma, Mwanza, Geita and Shinyanga—representing a collective population of 10.2 million and more than 750,000 stunted children. These regions were selected for their documented high rates of stunting and anemia, high numbers of stunted children, low levels of appropriate child feeding practices and the potential to leverage local resources, including the presence of partner civil society organizations.

ASTUTE aims to build the capacity of 50 local CSO partners; train more than 3,600 district nutritionists, community workers, health facility workers and non-health sector service providers; reach 3 million mothers, caregivers and decision makers with improved child care and feeding information; and reach more than 8 million people with a broad, multi-pronged communication strategy.