IMA World Health/Staff

T

he symbols of Easter are life-affirming: Jesus’ resurrection from the dead and colorful eggs symbolizing new birth.

Many Christians observe Lent, preparing their hearts and minds for the celebration of life at Easter through sacrifice and prayer. Some wake early to worship on Easter Sunday, eager to capture the feeling of joy felt at the early morning discovery of the empty tomb.

At IMA World Health, our focus is on turning the life-affirming joy of Easter into service for people in need.

For example, we work to improve access to health services for more than 8.3 million people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Part of our ongoing efforts include constructing 250 new health centers and rehabilitating 200 health facilities there.

In Haiti, we are part of an ongoing effort to control and eliminate seven targeted Neglected Tropical Diseases. We couldn’t be happier to know that treatment is working, and recently no signs of lymphatic filariasis were found among children in 10 communes in the Southeast Department.

On behalf of everyone at IMA World Health, we want to  thank you and wish you a happy, healthy Easter!

In Tanzania, we recently celebrated 20 years of work, which includes a program to treat Burkitt’s Lymphoma, a deadly and disfiguring childhood cancer. To date, IMA has provided treatment for 4,500 children and trained 2,000 health care professionals and students to identify and treat the disease.

In South Sudan, our Rapid Results Health Project has helped strengthen a health system for 3.3 million people. And in Indonesia, we are designing and implementing a behavior-change campaign to reduce childhood stunting.

These are just some of the many ways we work to build healthier communities around the world, which is something we couldn’t do alone. Our work is made possible through partnerships and donations. With the help of everyone who supports IMA, we are able to work toward better lives for people in need.

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IMA World Health - Emergency Health Services South Sudan